12 Mocktails of Christmas

 

nofasd_logo

Count down to Christmas with the 12 mocktails of Christmas advent calendar

The silly season is now upon us and the diary is jam packed with function after function, family gatherings, parties and catch ups all featuring lots of food, drinks and alcohol. For those who are pregnant, planning a pregnancy or taking a break from alcohol, Christmas often means trying to fend off the constant offers of alcoholic drinks while making the most of your sparkling water.

NOFASD and Pregnant Pause (FARE – Foundation for Alcohol Research and Education) want to ‘rock the mock’ this Christmas and have compiled the best mouth-watering mocktails for their 12 Mocktails of Christmas advent calendar. When mocktails taste this good, who needs alcohol? Ice-cold, fruity and delicious, these handpicked cocktails sans the booze are easy to make and ideal for all occasions. Save the plastic cups for picnics, these liquorless libations need to be served up in proper glassware – going alcohol free doesn’t mean being demoted to the kiddies table.

Whether you’re pregnant, planning a pregnancy, on a health kick, the designated driver or prefer not to drink alcohol or want to be the hostess with the mostest, why not beat the heat this Christmas and with mix it up with these tasty mocktails.

12 Mocktails of Christmas_Mocktail 12Fruity Father Christmas  punch

250g strawberries, halved

60g raspberries

75g blueberries

1 ripe kiwifruit, peeled, finely chopped

2 cups cranberry juice

2 cups of raspberry juice

4 cups chilled lemonade

2 cups chilled pineapple juice

1/4 cup fresh mint leaves

Divide the strawberries, raspberries, blueberries and kiwifruit evenly among 2 ice-cube trays. Cover with cold water and place in the freezer for 4 hours or overnight until set.

Combine the fruit juice, lemonade and pineapple juice in a large serving jug. Add the ice cubes and mint, and stir to combine. Serve immediately.

http://www.taste.com.au/recipes/2852/santa+claus+punch

12 Mocktails of Christmas_Mocktail 11

Ginger beer and pineapple punch

850ml unsweetened pineapple juice

750ml good ginger beer

½  an ice cube tray of tea ice cubes

a handful of fresh mint sprigs

slices of your favourite fruit, like lime or orange

the pulp from one large passionfruit (optional)

Pour it all into a jug, stir and serve immediately. Make sure each glass gets some tea ice cubes

http://allrecipes.com.au/recipe/10265/ginger-beer-and-pineapple-punch.aspx

12 Mocktails of Christmas_Mocktail 10Pink grapefruit ‘margaritas’

2 tablespoons coloured icing sugar

1 lime

6 teaspoons pomegranate syrup or grenadine

1 ½  cups pink-grapefruit juice

Place icing sugar in a shallow dish or plate. Slice six thin rounds from the middle of lime; set aside. Rub lime wedge around rims of six glasses; dip each rim in sugar to coat. Pour 1 teaspoon pomegranate syrup into bottom of each glass.

Place grapefruit juice and 2 cups ice cubes in a blender. Process on high speed until ice is crushed. Pour frozen mixture into martini glasses, and stir to combine with syrup. Garnish with reserved lime rounds or fresh seasonal berries, and serve immediately.

http://www.marthastewart.com/334284/pink-grapefruit-margaritas

12 Mocktails of Christmas_Mocktail 9Bellini Cocktail

1/4 cup peach nectar, chilled

3/4 cup ginger ale, chilled

1/4 cup fresh fruit or berries of your choice

Pour peach nectar evenly between two champagne glasses. Top with ginger ale and fresh fruit berries. Serve immediately and enjoy.

Modified from recipe at http://www.tablespoon.com/recipes/peach-bellini-mocktails/00b37cf1-3fc5-423c-9a08-fab19d892a34

12 Mocktails of Christmas_Mocktail 8Sparkling sangria

4 cups black grape juice

1 plum

1 peach

2 clementines or mandarins

6-8 strawberries

2 cups ginger ale

A bunch of mint

Quarter plum and peach, and remove pits. Place fruit in a large pitcher.

Remove peel from clementines, halve, and place in pitcher.

Remove greens from berries, halve, and place in pitcher.

Cover with grape juice. Stir well, and let sit in fridge for 1-2 hours (or more).

Mix with ginger ale and add mint just before serving.

Modified from recipe at http://jensfavoritecookies.com/2013/04/05/sangria-mocktail/

12 Mocktails of Christmas_Mocktail 7Shirley temple

4 tbsp grenadine syrup

2 cups ginger ale

1 Maraschino cherry

Pop Rocks (optional)

Rim glass with pink Pop Rocks. Add grenadine syrup to ginger ale. Garnish with a maraschino cherry

Modified from recipe at http://www.parenting.com/gallery/mocktails-recipes?page=5

12 Mocktails of Christmas_Mocktail 6Chocolate Mock-Tini

1/2 cup chocolate milk

1 cup mint choc chip ice cream

Ice

Drinking chocolate powder

1 candy cane (optional)

Wet rim of a martini glass and dip into drinking chocolate powder. Blend together chocolate milk, mint-chocolate chip ice cream and 4 ice cubes and add to martini glass. Garnish with candy cane.

Modified from recipe at http://www.parenting.com/gallery/mocktails-recipes?page=3

12 Mocktails of Christmas_Mocktail 5Snuggles on the beach

1/3 cup cranberry juice

¼ cup grapefruit juice

40 mL peach nectar

2 teaspoons of grenadine

¼ cup of ginger ale

Throw everything in a highball glass with ice. Stir. Garnish with an orange round and some cherries. Drink up! Feel free to increase quantity to make  enough for the entire party or tweak the ingredient amounts to your taste.

Modified from recipe at http://mixthatdrink.com/cuddles-on-the-beach/

12 Mocktails of Christmas_Mocktail 4Apple fake-tini

1 cup sparkling apple juice (preferably dry)

ice for mixing

cinnamon sugar for rimming the glass

orange or cinnamon stick to garnish (optional)

For an extra kick add 2 tablespoons of Ginger-Cinnamon syrup:

Mix 1 cup sugar, 1 cup water, 2 cinnamon sticks, and some ginger to taste in a saucepan over medium heat. Heat until sugar is dissolved, let cool and strain to remove excess ginger and cinnamon.

For the Fake-tini

Prepare martini glass by wetting the rim with sparkling apple juice and then dipping in cinnamon-sugar.
Add ice to martini shaker. Pour in apple juice (and ginger syrup if applicable). Shake and pour into prepared glass. Garnish with apple slice or cinnamon stick.

Modified from recipe at http://www.rachelcooks.com/2012/09/14/ginger-cinnamon-apple-cider-fake-tini/

12 Mocktails of Christmas_Mocktail 3Virgin Mary

1 litre tomato juice, chilled

2 tablespoons Worcestershire sauce

1 teaspoon Tabasco sauce

2 cups ice cubes

1 lemon, quartered

Salt and pepper

4 celery stalks and Tabasco sauce (optional), to serve

Combine tomato juice, worcestershire sauce and Tabasco in a jug. Divide ice between 4 glasses. Squeeze 1 lemon quarter into each glass. Place squeezed quarter in each in a high ball glass. Top with juice mixture. Season with salt and pepper. Serve with celery and extra Tabasco (if using)

Modified from recipe at http://www.taste.com.au/recipes/23360/virgin+mary

12 Mocktails of Christmas_Mocktail 2Mockmosa

2 parts orange juice

3 parts dry sparkling white grape juice

Mint (optional)

Pour the orange juice into a flute glass and then pour the sparkling white grape juice. Optionally, you can garnish with a mint sprig.

Modified from recipe at http://mixthatdrink.com/mockmosa-non-alcoholic/

12 Mocktails of Christmas_Mocktail 1Nojito

12 to 14 small mint leaves or 6-8 big ones

30 ml fresh lime juice

2 tablespoons brown sugar

120 ml of sparkling mineral water

Put the mint leaves, lime juice and brown sugar in a tall cocktail glass and muddle the leaves. Fill the glass with ice cubes and add the mineral water. Stir to mix up the sugar. Garnish with another mint sprig.

Modified from recipe at http://mixthatdrink.com/nojito-cocktail-non-alcoholic/

Retrieved from http://www.nofasd.org.au/announcements/12-mocktails-of-christmas-1?A=SearchResult&SearchID=117050950&ObjectID=91471&ObjectType=7

Prevention with Women Living with FASD

f28df-1445359631870

Many women who have FASD are able to benefit from tailored support on substance use problems. Audrey McFarlane, Executive Director of Lakeland Centre for FASDin Cold Lake AB recently shared strategies for working on FASD prevention with women who have FASD themselves. One of the LCFASD programs, the 2nd Floor Women’s Recovery Centre, provides residential treatment exclusively to women. She explained how programs can better support women who have FASD.

Challenges

Because of the possible neuro-behavioural and physical health issues associated with FASD, working with women living with FASD may pose particular challenges for the service provider due to:

  • Limited understanding of how their body works and how or why to use birth control;
  • Limited understanding of how to get housing, money and to keep themselves safe;
  • Physical health issues, such as diabetes, STDs, vision, hearing and dental;
  • Limited ability to envision the future;
  • Inability to link actions to consequences, which makes them more likely to be connected to the justice system and to have many children not in their care with multiple partners.

Strategies

McFarlane says that these and other challenges mean it often takes longer to see the benefits of supports. Yet, there are a number of strategies that have proven successful.

  • Take a family alcohol history and ask each woman, specifically, if she has a diagnosis of FASD. Woman will tell you if they do, but are often not even asked.
  • Make suggestions in key areas where they can agree or disagree rather than using client-generated approaches.
  • Prioritize building a relationship so that the woman will come back for support as needed. Reframe returning to treatment as a positive, not a negative.
  • Expect to spend more time on basic life skills and necessities. She may not have connection to family or social services. This means treatment needs to be longer.
  • Approaches that work best include solution-focused counselling, physical activities, positive touch, relaxation, and connections that develop a sense of belonging, like volunteering and cultural practices.

Resources

Here are a number of resources on trauma-informed and FASD-informed approaches for working with women living with FASD.

FASD Informed

Evaluation of FASD Prevention and FASD Support Programs website

FASD Informed Approach by Mary Mueller, RN, Waterloo Region Public Health and Emergency Services

FASD Informed Practice for Community Based Programs, College of New Caledonia

Working with Women Who May Have FASD Themselves – Webinar View Slides – Recording

Trauma Informed

Pregnancy, Alcohol, and Trauma-informed Practice, The Prevention Conversation

Trauma-informed Approaches to FASD Prevention – Webinar View Slides – Recording

Trauma-Informed Practice Resource List, Centre of Excellence for Women’s Health

_________________________

For more on this topic, see earlier posts:

WEBINAR JUNE 23 – WORKING WITH PREGNANT AND PARENTING WOMEN: LEARNINGS FROM HERWAY HOME, June 16, 2016

NEW CURRICULUM FOR FASD INFORMED PRACTICE, August 1, 2016

THE MOTHER-CHILD STUDY: EVALUATING TREATMENTS FOR SUBSTANCE-USING WOMEN, March 18, 2015

FACT SHEET ON SUPPORTING WOMEN WITH FASD IN RESIDENTIAL SUBSTANCE ABUSE TREATMENT, April 22, 2013

TRAUMA MATTERS: GUIDELINES FOR TRAUMA‐INFORMED PRACTICES IN WOMEN’S SUBSTANCE USE SERVICES, April 17, 2013

Retrieved from https://fasdprevention.wordpress.com/2017/11/20/prevention-with-women-living-with-fasd/

Alberta has Some of the Highest Rates of Violence in Canada

Often, people think of violence as physical, like hitting, slapping, shoving or cutting. Violence can take different forms and it happens without consent:

Types of violence against women

Domestic violence

It is any use of physical or sexual force, actual or threatened, in an intimate relationship. It can happen many times or just once, and the abuse happens through the use of assault and controlling behaviour.

The abuse may include one or more of the following:

  • physical, emotional, psychological or sexual abuse
  • criminal harassment (i.e. stalking)
  • threats to harm children, other family members, pets and property
Intimate partner violence
Happens between people who are or were dating, common-law or married. They could also have had a child together without being in a relationship.
Family violence
Happens between parents and children, siblings, or extended family members.

Sexual assault

It is a legal term used in Canada to explain any form of sexual contact without consent. It can include forced or unwanted kissing, touching, vaginal penetration, anal penetration or oral sex. It is a crime.

Sexual exploitation

This happens when a person in a position of trust or authority uses that power to start or attempt sexual activity with another person. It can be through direct or indirect touching, violence, coercion or the use of threats.

Examples of sexual exploitation include sex work and pornography.

Sexual exploitation is a crime when the exploited person is:

  • younger than 18 years of age or
  • older than 18 years of age, has a disability, and the exploitation happens without consent

Sexual harassment

Unwanted or uninvited sexual remarks, gestures, sounds and actions that make a person feel unsafe, degraded or uncomfortable, even if the harasser claims to have been only joking.

Sexual harassment creates a frightening or hostile school or work environment. Women and girls are usually targets of harassment.

Some examples are:

  • rude jokes, sexual remarks, spreading rumours
  • sexual put-downs
  • cat calls, rating appearance, whistling
  • insults about  sexual  orientation
  • bragging about sexual relations
  • any forced sexual contact (touching, patting, grabbing, kissing)

Status of Women initiatives

Initiatives for 2016

Violence can lead to long-term harm. Women and girls who experience violence may find themselves unable to keep up relationships, work or good health. They may experience poverty or homelessness.

Status of Women is working to keep more women and girls safe while working to undo the problems that underline the violence. These plans are either under way or planned for 2016:

  • Work with other ministries to put in place the Family Violence Framework
  • Be part of the process of the national inquiry on Missing and Murdered Indigenous Women and Girls
  • Help to develop a proposal with the City of Edmonton for the United Nations Safe Cities Initiative

Supports for women and girls experiencing violence

The Government of Alberta has made progress on getting supports for those women and girls who experience violence. Funds go to these initiatives:

  • Sexual assault centres
    • $4 million each year supports 11 sexual assault centres and the Association of Alberta Sexual Assault Services.
  • Family violence prevention
    • About $95 million each year helps to address family violence. $24 million helps to address sexual violence and abuse.
  • Women’s emergency and second-stage shelters
    • $15 million new funding in 2015 increases supports for women and children affected by family violence to more than $49 million each year.
  • Operational funding
    • Alberta funds 30 women’s emergency shelters and gives program funding to 11 second-stage shelters. Operational funding also increased shelter staff salaries.
  • Shelter Enhancement Fund (2014)
    • This money funded urgent facility fire, health and safety maintenance projects in women’s emergency.
  • Family Violence Hurts Everyone: A Framework to End Family Violence in Alberta (0.8 MB)

Retrieved from: https://www.alberta.ca/violence-against-women.aspx

How to do Holiday Parties While Pregnant

It’s hard to believe the holiday season is upon us. We’re decorating, baking cookies, going to holiday parties, shopping in a frenzy for that perfect gift, gathering with family. Maybe squeezing in that “girls night out” where everyone has promised to not exchange gifts, but to just celebrate the season with friendship, great food and drinks. This can be the most wonderful time of the year. But when pregnant or trying to get pregnant, it can be challenging to face the decision about whether to celebrate the season with or without alcohol.

Drinking and pregnancy

Why is this decision so important?

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecology, and the American Academy of Pediatricians, “there is no safe amount of alcohol, no safe type of alcohol and no safe time to drink when a woman is pregnant.” And yet, in 2016, the CDC estimated that 3.3 million women in the United States were at risk for having an alcohol-exposed pregnancy.

When a woman drinks so does the developing baby, who lacks the ability to process or metabolize alcohol through their liver or other organs. The baby has the same blood alcohol concentration as the mother. It makes no difference if the alcoholic drink consumed is a beer, glass of wine or a distilled spirit or liquor such as vodka.

Know the risks

Evidence-based research has found that drinking even small amounts of alcohol while pregnant can increase the risk of miscarriage, stillbirth, prematurity or sudden infant death syndrome. In addition, more than 40 years of published research has shown alcohol to be a neurotoxin in utero. This means that alcohol is a toxic substance to the developing baby just like carbon monoxide and lead.

Alcohol can cause the death of developing brain cells, even during the early stages of pregnancy. Most babies negatively affected by alcohol exposure have no apparent physical birth defects. But they can have lifelong behavioral and learning problems that often go undiagnosed or misdiagnosed as autism or attention deficit disorder instead of one of the fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASDs). Current studies estimate that 1 in 20 school-age children may have FASDs.

Going alcohol free

How do you navigate and embrace an alcohol-free holiday season? Not that we condone stretching the truth, but if you have just found out you are pregnant and aren’t telling anyone yet, you can always pass on alcohol by saying you are the designated driver, that you are taking a medication that can’t be combined with alcohol or that your stomach just isn’t up for it.

Any time in pregnancy, you can always order mocktails, nonalcoholic beverages or sparkling water with fresh fruit. They can be very festive and help you get your jingle on during this holiday season and throughout your pregnancy.

Learn more

FASDs are 100 percent preventable. So, if you are pregnant or plan on getting pregnant, please refrain from any alcohol use to ensure the healthiest environment for your baby to grow and develop.

The NC Fetal Alcohol Prevention Program (FASDinNC) strives to prevent alcohol-exposed pregnancies by providing training, education and resources to women of childbearing age and the professionals that serve them. This effort includes dispelling any myths surrounding the safety of drinking alcohol during pregnancy, even light drinking.

Amy Hendricks is the program coordinator for the NC Fetal Alcohol Prevention Program (FASDinNC) at Mission Fullerton Genetics Center. For more information on how you can prevent FASDs and find great mocktail recipes, contact the NC Fetal Alcohol Prevention Program at (828) 213-0035 or go to FASDinNC.org.

More online:

North Carolina Fetal Alcohol Prevention Program, www.fasdinnc.org/

National Organization on Fetal Alcohol Syndrome, www.nofas.org/

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/fasd/alcohol-use.html

Reposted from this site: Citizen-Times

Misunderstood and bullied: Teen with fetal alcohol syndrome asks for compassion

By Viola Pruss, CBC News Posted: Jul 02, 2017 7:00 AM AT Last Updated: Jul 02, 2017 7:00 AM AT

Marsha Munn and her son, Blaze, who was diagnosed with fetal alcohol syndrome, a mental and physical disability caused by his birth mother drinking during her pregnancy.

Marsha Munn and her son, Blaze, who was diagnosed with fetal alcohol syndrome, a mental and physical disability caused by his birth mother drinking during her pregnancy. (CBC)

When Marsha Munn adopted a baby boy 14 years ago, she knew her friend, the birth mother, liked to drink and party.

She didn’t know about fetal alcohol syndrome.

Today, the Doaktown woman says her son, Blaze, struggles with hyperactivity, memory problems and intense, uncontrolled bouts of anger — all likely caused by a disability that started in his mother’s womb.

Munn said she’s learned to cope with her son’s disability. But she struggles with the bullying and lost friendships Blaze suffers, and with his depression.

“Many times he’s come home wanting to kill himself and that’s probably one of my hardest things, is to watch him say he wants to kill himself because of the way people react to him in the community or at school,” she said.

Munn and her son attended a workshop of the Canada Fetal Alcohol Spectrum Disorder Research Network in Fredericton this week.

‘This is my only chance to say how my life is and to let them know how I feel.’– Blaze Munn, diagnosed with FAS

The event, which is part of a 16-week certificate program at the University of New Brunswick, provides social workers, parents and volunteers with the latest research and information on the disorder.

For Blaze, it was a chance to share his experience, which he said many people, especially other children, don’t understand.

“They don’t know how we actually are and how we actually feel,” he said. “This is my only chance to say how my life is and to let them know how I feel.”

Drinking during pregnancy

Fetal alcohol syndrome is the most severe form of fetal alcohol spectrum disorders, which are caused by drinking alcohol during pregnancy.

Munn, FAS syndrome, NB

Marsha Munn says Blaze didn’t start acting out until Grade 1. (Marsha Munn/ Supplied)

Exposure to alcohol during the pregnancy changes and damages the infant’s brain, which can lead to lifelong physical, mental and behavioural difficulties, as well as learning disabilities, the research network, known as CanFASD, writes on its website.

Often, these changes are not detected until a child reaches primary or middle school age, when difficulties in school and at home become problems, the website said.

Munn said Blaze was a normal, though somewhat hyper, child until Grade 1, when he started acting “rude, kicking his grade one teacher, swearing at her, just really out of control.”

He was diagnosed a year later. Munn said the doctor knew right away when she mentioned that his birth mother drank.

‘Anybody can have FASD’

Michelle Stewart, strategic research lead with the CanFASD, said she’s still surprised by how little people know about the disability, its causes and effects.

“Sometimes people don’t understand it’s a lifelong disability, or they don’t understand the disability so they think somebody … just needs to mature or that somebody just needs to try harder,” she said.

“There are also misunderstandings about FASD in communities when sometimes people think that its only Indigenous people that have FASD. … Anybody can have FASD.”

Michelle Stewart - Canada FASD Research Network

Michelle Stewart, strategic research lead with the Canada FASD Research Network, says she’s still surprised at how little people know about the disability, its causes and effects. (CBC)

Stewart said many of the mothers and children she meets suffer from social isolation, bullying and stigmatization in their community.

Yet some of the women did not even realize they were pregnant when they drank, which also means the disorder is only 100 per cent preventable if you don’t drink, she said.

Need for more education

Across Canada, up to one in 20 children could be affected by fetal alcohol syndrome, said Annette Cormier, program manager with the FASD Centre of Excellence in Moncton.

Based on the number of births in the province last year, between 250 to 300 people should be diagnosed a year, she said. But the Moncton centre sees only 400 clients.

“That’s quite an alarming number of children that we are missing,” she said.

Annette Cormier – pgm. manager FASD Centre of Excellence in Moncton

Annette Cormier says the research is still not definitive on when during the pregnancy alcohol causes the most damage to an infant, but mothers need to know about the dangers of drinking while pregnant. (CBC)

Cormier based her estimates on numbers from the U.S. Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and the comparatively high number of women in the province who report drinking heavily at least once a month.

Statistics Canada said 15.3 per cent of New Brunswick women said they drank heavily — four or more drinks at once at least once a month in 2014. The Canadian average was 13.2 per cent.

The U.S. organization reported on its website that little research is available on how many people have the syndrome.

But the incidence of the syndrome among U.S. and Western European schoolchildren could be as highi as two to five out of 100, based on physical examinations and estimates from experts, it said.

More referrals at Moncton centre

Cormier said the waiting list for an assessment is 2.5 years, but the Moncton centre starts assisting families with resources and education right away.

Marsha and baby Blaze, FASD

Marsha Munn, who adopted Blaze, left, 14 years ago, says she believes his birth mother was unaware her drinking during pregnancy would affect him. (Marsha Munn/CBC)

She added that demands at the centre have been increasing, with an average of 10 new referrals per month.

“As the months go by, our client caseload increases incredibly,” she said.

The centre hopes to open a satellite clinic by 2018. That way people won’t have to travel across New Brunswick to get a diagnosis, she said.

‘And we have moms that, you know, the doctors told them that an occasional glass of wine would be okay throughout the pregnancy.’– Annette CormierFASD Centre of Excellence

But she also stressed the need for more education.

While the research is still out on when during the pregnancy alcohol causes the most damage to an infant, mothers need to know about the dangers of drinking while pregnant, she said.

“And we have moms that, you know, the doctors told them that an occasional glass of wine would be OK throughout the pregnancy,” she said.

Compassionate

Cormier said there is a bright side to the disorder. The earlier children are diagnosed, the greater their chance of success, she said.

Some of the youths she’s known went on the become engineers, writers and psychologists — despite all the struggles they went through early in life, she said.

Blaze said he always wanted to be a firefighter because “they are lifesavers, and I just want to save other people’s lives, too.”

Blaze Munn discusses living with fetal alcohol syndrome

00:00 00:57

Blaze Munn discusses living with fetal alcohol syndrome0:57

He said most people with fetal alcohol spectrum disorder love to talk and are, contrary to how they acting out at times, compassionate and caring.

But it’s not just his behaviour that causes problems, he said.

If people would take the time to understand his disorder and react calmly instead of raising their voice when he gets mad, “then I think they would understand what I’m going through and be able to cope with me better.”

‘I would try to make [my birth mother] understand that it’s hard for us and that she didn’t need to drink in the first place, and that if we weren’t like this, we probably wouldn’t get bullied.’– Blaze Munn, diagnosed with fetal alcohol syndrome

His mother, Marsha, added that a lot of his teachers don’t understand him “as good as they could.”

But she admitted that she also had to learn a lot of strategies to deal with Blaze.

While she thinks his birth mother was unaware of the effects her drinking would have on him throughout his life, Blaze said he’d be less forgiving if he ever met her.

“I would say, ‘Why would you drink when I was a baby, why did you have to do this to me?'” he said.

“I would try to make her understand that it’s hard for us and that she didn’t need to drink in the first place, and that if we weren’t like this, we probably wouldn’t get bullied.”

With files from Catherine Harrop

Reposted from: CBC

Corrections Canada Funded Just 7 FASD Assessments Last Year – SBS News

‘We are quite disappointed with the service on this matter,’ says prison watchdog

By Kelly Malone, CBC News Posted: Oct 28, 2017 5:02 AM CT Last Updated: Oct 28, 2017 10:40 AM CT

Correctional Service Canada only provided funding for seven specialized fetal alcohol spectrum disorder assessments last year. Research suggests up to a quarter of inmates in federal corrections could have fetal alcohol spectrum disorder.

Correctional Service Canada only provided funding for seven specialized fetal alcohol spectrum disorder assessments last year. Research suggests up to a quarter of inmates in federal corrections could have fetal alcohol spectrum disorder. (Fred Thornhill/Reuters)

A young Indigenous man sat in a Winnipeg courtroom at the end of August, staring intently at his red running shoes, occasionally fidgeting with his shirt.

“We all know [my client] has FASD but he has not been formally diagnosed,” his defence lawyer, Wendy Martin White, told the judge.

“What we think of normally for rehabilitation has to be thought of differently for someone like [my client].”

That young man is part of a problem everyone knows Canada’s corrections system faces — but no one is sure just how big the problem is thanks to under-diagnosis.

Research suggests up to a quarter of inmates in federal corrections could have fetal alcohol spectrum disorder, but Correctional Service Canada only provided funding for seven specialized assessments across the country last year, according to information provided to the country’s prison watchdog for the 2016-17 fiscal year.

Corrections Canada said assessments may have been funded at the local level but that information was not available.

Correctional Investigator of Canada Ivan Zinger said his office has provided several recommendations over multiple annual reports about collecting better data on the prevalence of FASD, doing better assessments and providing tailor-made programming, but “very little is actually being done to address the issues,” he said.

“We are quite disappointed with the service on this matter.”

‘They are the ones that get caught’

Fetal alcohol spectrum disorder is a brain injury that is caused when an unborn baby is exposed to alcohol. It is the leading known cause of preventable developmental disability in Canada, impacting at least one per cent of people across the country, according to Health Canada.

FASD can range from mild to severe. Some people show physical signs, like a smooth ridge between the nose and upper lip and a smaller head, but many of the conditions associated with FASD are cognitive, including poor memory, learning disabilities, difficulty in school and poor reasoning and judgement skills.

People with FASD can end up coming into conflict with the justice system because many of the symptoms make them followers, said Albert Chudley — a top FASD expert, geneticist and professor at the University of Manitoba.

Those who live with the disorder don’t understand the world the same way other people do, he said.

“They are rarely the leaders in crime but they are the ones that get caught.”

Chudley was part of a Correctional Service Canada report in 2011 looking at FASD prevalence at Stony Mountain Institution in Manitoba. It found that 10 per cent of participants had FASD, and another 15 per cent met some of the diagnostic criteria, but were missing information to make a confirmed diagnosis — such as maternal confirmation of drinking during pregnancy. Chudley said he was shocked to see the FASD rate was 10 times greater in Stony than the general population.

“I thought maybe double, maybe triple, but not tenfold greater. And that’s an underestimate,” he said.

The report had three recommendations, including starting FASD screening upon admission to federal corrections. That means inmates could get FASD-focused programs while behind bars to better prepare for re-entry to the community. But Chudley said none of those recommendations were acted on.

“We think that there is good evidence that when they get the help and the support, reoffending drops,” he said. “So it saves the community, it saves everybody a lot of the costs — not just monetary costs, but the costs to society and to families.”

Once inside, inmates with FASD have a poor correctional outcome, according to the prison watchdog. They are more likely to be involved in institutional incidents, incur institutional charges and spend more time of their sentence incarcerated, and are less likely to complete programs.

‘We need to adjust our expectation’

Up to 60 per cent of Martin White’s clients are either confirmed to have, or suspected of having, fetal alcohol spectrum disorder, she said in an interview after the August court appearance with her client. That client, who she asked CBC News not name, started picking up charges when he was a teenager.

He’d been shuffled around the child-welfare system and ended up living with his foster grandfather, who was in the courtroom during the sentencing in August.

But when the grandfather had health issues, Martin White’s client went into different support homes. When he gets angry or his routine is broken, he acts out, often by exposing himself or masturbating in public. From 2012 to 2017, Martin White’s client was convicted multiple times, including several times for failing to comply with his probation orders.

Winnipeg courthouse

Winnipeg lawyer Wendy Martin White says up to 60 per cent of her clients have fetal alcohol spectrum disorder. (Bert Savard/CBC)

Martin White told the court that her client will never be 100 per cent cured and “we need to adjust our expectation of his abilities.” While he doesn’t have a formal FASD diagnosis, he shows clear cognitive disabilities and there’s a confirmation from his birth mother that she was drinking while pregnant.

Martin White said it would be best if Manitoba had a specialized FASD court but until then corrections, both provincial and federal, need to start looking at things differently — starting with getting people diagnosed.

“Those kinds of diagnosis are super critical to properly dealing with the individual,” she said.

Provincial and territorial numbers unknown

While there have been some estimates of the number of federal inmates with FASD, when it comes to provincial jails, that number is largely unknown. Each province and territory has a different approach, but most do not do FASD screening upon entry and do not keep statistics.

A spokesperson for the government of the Northwest Territories said they do not track the number of people in jails there with FASD, but they “believe there are a significant number.” The territory does have a wellness court specifically designed for people with addictions or cognitive issues.

In British Columbia, inmates who are accepted into the Integrated Offender Management Homelessness Intervention Program are screened for FASD, but that doesn’t include all inmates.

Many provinces do have more robust testing in youth justice, including the FASD Youth Justice Program in Manitoba, which helps kids who may have been affected by prenatal alcohol exposure get a formal diagnosis.

‘I’ve been dragged through the mud’

Russ Hilsher, 40, says his diagnosis has been essential to connecting with services that have helped him avoid the justice system — or in some cases, navigate it more successfully.

Originally from Ghost River, near the mouth of the Cheepay River in northeastern Ontario, Hilsher’s birth mother drank during her pregnancy. He was taken from her soon after and was diagnosed with FASD as a baby.

But when he moved to a foster home in Winnipeg around the age of 13, the “transition from bush life to city life” was difficult, he said.

He struggled in different areas of his life, especially school, where there wasn’t much information shared with teachers about FASD. One time, he was asked to write a book report, so he went home and rewrote the book — word by word — until he fell asleep. When he turned it in to his teacher the next day he was upset to find out he didn’t get any marks for his hard work.

Russ Hilsher

Russ Hilsher, 40, says having his fetal alcohol spectrum disorder diagnosis was important, but there aren’t enough resources behind bars. (Kelly Malone/CBC)

He also started getting picked up by police for things like theft. Hilsher explained that he would see something on the street and just pick it up, without ever thinking it belonged to someone else. Later, he was charged with offences like assault and fraud.

“It’s been rough over the last 20 years for me with the criminal justice system and being involved in that,” Hilsher said.

“Luckily, now I am able to step back from it and look back at it and say, ‘Wow, I’ve been dragged through the mud,'” he said.

“Now I’m just kind of brushing the mud off myself.”

When he first became involved with the justice system, Hilsher said lawyers and judges didn’t really understand what his diagnosis meant and how it contributed to the trouble he was getting in. He said that’s improved over the last decade, but said that inside corrections, it’s still a struggle for people with FASD to connect with services and programs, and to avoid trouble.

Corrections needs a national strategy: Zinger

Correctional Service Canada is committed to responding to the needs of federal offenders with FASD, spokesperson Stevenson Stephanie said in an email to CBC News. Corrections Canada does a mental health screening at intake, which identifies offenders who may require mental health services, she said. But the agency does not track the number of offenders entering federal correctional facilities who live with FASD.

“We have adopted a multi-pronged approach to strengthening the provision of correctional services to offenders with mental health needs,” she said.

“This includes: providing resources to our staff; ensuring our programs assist offenders with cognitive deficits, including those demonstrated within the FASD continuum; adapting correctional programs to maximize the learning of individual offenders, including those with FASD; offering additional individualized supports; and ensuring offenders undergo education assessments upon admission to maximize their potential to benefit from our programs.”

Without knowing how many inmates have FASD, Canada’s prisons can’t even begin to truly meet their needs, Zinger said.

“I think there should be an overall strategy, a national strategy that would go from admission to assessment to programming to discharge planning to community corrections,” the corrections investigator said.

“There is no systemic assessment and nothing in terms of programs.”

Guest Column: How to do Holiday Parties While Pregnant

qgpofgwp6uku9syah3m3

Amy Hendricks: Retrieved from http://www.citizen-times.com/story/life/family/2017/11/19/guest-column-how-do-holiday-parties-while-pregnant/850207001/

It’s hard to believe the holiday season is upon us. We’re decorating, baking cookies, going to holiday parties, shopping in a frenzy for that perfect gift, gathering with family. Maybe squeezing in that “girls night out” where everyone has promised to not exchange gifts, but to just celebrate the season with friendship, great food and drinks. This can be the most wonderful time of the year. But when pregnant or trying to get pregnant, it can be challenging to face the decision about whether to celebrate the season with or without alcohol.

Drinking and pregnancy

Why is this decision so important?

According to the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, the American College of Obstetricians and Gynecology, and the American Academy of Pediatricians, “there is no safe amount of alcohol, no safe type of alcohol and no safe time to drink when a woman is pregnant.” And yet, in 2016, the CDC estimated that 3.3 million women in the United States were at risk for having an alcohol-exposed pregnancy.

When a woman drinks so does the developing baby, who lacks the ability to process or metabolize alcohol through their liver or other organs. The baby has the same blood alcohol concentration as the mother. It makes no difference if the alcoholic drink consumed is a beer, glass of wine or a distilled spirit or liquor such as vodka.

Know the risks

Evidence-based research has found that drinking even small amounts of alcohol while pregnant can increase the risk of miscarriage, stillbirth, prematurity or sudden infant death syndrome. In addition, more than 40 years of published research has shown alcohol to be a neurotoxin in utero. This means that alcohol is a toxic substance to the developing baby just like carbon monoxide and lead.

Alcohol can cause the death of developing brain cells, even during the early stages of pregnancy. Most babies negatively affected by alcohol exposure have no apparent physical birth defects. But they can have lifelong behavioural and learning problems that often go undiagnosed or misdiagnosed as autism or attention deficit disorder instead of one of the fetal alcohol spectrum disorders (FASDs). Current studies estimate that 1 in 20 school-age children may have FASDs.

Going alcohol-free

How do you navigate and embrace an alcohol-free holiday season? Not that we condone stretching the truth, but if you have just found out you are pregnant and aren’t telling anyone yet, you can always pass on alcohol by saying you are the designated driver, that you are taking a medication that can’t be combined with alcohol or that your stomach just isn’t up for it.

Anytime in pregnancy, you can always order mocktails, nonalcoholic beverages or sparkling water with fresh fruit. They can be very festive and help you get your jingle on during this holiday season and throughout your pregnancy.

Learn more

FASDs are preventable. So, if you are pregnant or plan on getting pregnant, please refrain from any alcohol use to ensure the healthiest environment for your baby to grow and develop.

The NC Fetal Alcohol Prevention Program (FASDinNC) strives to prevent alcohol-exposed pregnancies by providing training, education and resources to women of childbearing age and the professionals that serve them. This effort includes dispelling any myths surrounding the safety of drinking alcohol during pregnancy, even light drinking.

Amy Hendricks is the program coordinator for the NC Fetal Alcohol Prevention Program (FASDinNC) at Mission Fullerton Genetics Center. For more information on how you can prevent FASDs and find great mocktail recipes, contact the NC Fetal Alcohol Prevention Program at (828) 213-0035 or go to FASDinNC.org.

More online:

North Carolina Fetal Alcohol Prevention Program, www.fasdinnc.org/

National Organization on Fetal Alcohol Syndrome, www.nofas.org/

Centers for Disease Control and Prevention, www.cdc.gov/ncbddd/fasd/alcohol-use.html

Posted by  

Findings: Is There a Relationship Between Adverse Childhood Experiences and Problem Drinking Behaviours?

research_image.width-600

Objectives

The study investigated the relationships between adverse childhood experiences (ACEs) and heavy and binge drinking, stratified by gender.

Study design

Population-based cross-sectional study.

Methods

Data were retrieved from 2012 Behavioral Risk Factor Surveillance System. Over 39,000 individuals from five states were included in the study. Multiple logistic regression models were used to analyze the weighted data to determine factors associated with heavy and binge drinking for men and women. Each model included ACEs and controlled for sociodemographic variables, depression and smoking status. Bonferroni method was used to correct multiple comparisons.

Results

Only a few relationships between ACEs and problem drinking were observed. Among men, living with a drug abuser as a child was significantly associated with both heavy and binge drinking compared to men who did not reside with a drug abuser as a child. Childhood verbal abuse was linked with men’s binge drinking compared to men who were not verbally abused as children. Among women, none of the nine ACEs examined in the study were associated with their heavy drinking. Only one ACE, verbal abuse, was found to be correlated with binge drinking, compared to women who did not experience childhood verbal abuse. In addition, we did not find the hypothesized, step-wise, graded relationship between the number of ACEs and heavy and binge drinking. However, the risk of heavy drinking was greater if the individual was exposed to four or more childhood adversities among both men and women.

Conclusion

Study hypotheses were only partially supported. Future studies should unpack the interplay among gender, socio-economic status, ACEs, and problem alcohol consumption.

To read more please visit: http://www.publichealthjrnl.com/article/S0033-3506(17)30178-6/abstract

Posted on  by 

N.W.T. MLAS Call For Formal FASD Strategy, Health Minister Says Take Action

 

pregnancy-test-dispenser

By Randi Beers, CBC News Posted: Nov 17, 2017 6:00 AM CT

The Yellowknife Association for Community Living began its fetal alcohol spectrum disorder (FASD) awareness campaign on Friday, as some MLAs called on the government to implement a formal strategy to combat the spectrum of disorders in the territory.

The association is delivering pregnancy tests to 12 Yellowknife establishments to dispense in their washrooms.

Lynn Elkin, executive director for the association, wants the campaign to get people thinking about the possibility they might be pregnant while they are out on the town. The pregnancy tests come with information about FASD and a collection of mocktail, or non-alcoholic, drink recipes.

“We know people were using it,” she said about the campaign in previous years. “We did have some phone calls that came where people said, ‘I’m [tested] positive and I was out at the bar last night so what should I be doing?’”

Territory should do more, say 2 MLAs

MLAs Cory Vanthuyne and Julie Green both applaud the work the association is doing. In fact, they both say they’d like to see the territorial government dedicate resources specifically to FASD awareness, prevention and support.

Vanthuyne applauds work done by Health Minister Glen Abernethy as chair of the Canada Northwest FASD partnership, but said there are areas where the government can do better.

He supports a 10-year plan to fight FASD.

“I think it’s something that would get pretty good support from the members of the Legislative Assembly,” Vanthuyne said.

Abernethy says his department is working on a disability action plan, which he says will include those with FASD, and expects to have the plan in MLAs’ hands by Christmas.

But Abernethy added that a dedicated plan to reduce FASD isn’t what the territory needs.

“We have a lot of action plans,” he said. “We need to take action rather than write these things.”

Glen Abernethy June 2016

N.W.T. Health Minister Glen Abernethy says the territory does not need a specific FASD plan. (CBC)

Alberta finishes 10-year strategy to combat FASD

In Alberta, one government official says the province is “leaps and bounds” ahead of where it was 10 years ago in regards to FASD, thanks to an innovative 10-year strategy which wrapped up earlier this year.

Janice Penner, the manager of FASD initiatives with that province’s Department of Community and Social Services, explained why she felt the initiative worked.

“Our approach in working with community was absolutely critical to our success,” she said.

Through the strategy, the government of Alberta has published data that paints a clear picture of the costs of FASD in the province. Approximately 46,000 Albertans live with FASD, costing the government $837 million per year. According to the Institute of Health Economics, the Alberta Government saves $784,000 for each prevented case of FASD.

As part of the strategy, Alberta implemented the Parent Child Assistance Program which partners women vulnerable to alcoholism and addiction to a support worker for a period of three years. Through this program alone, the government estimates it prevented 31 cases of FASD between 2008 and 2011, saving $22 million.

Penner wasn’t able to provide an exact amount the government spent to implement this strategy, but estimated it was $16.5 million per year, with a bit more spent in earlier years.

No FASD research in N.W.T.

According to a department spokesperson, the Department of Health and Social Services has never studied FASD in the N.W.T.

The territorial government has also never attempted to collect prevalence rates either, but refers to national studies that suggest up to four per cent of Canadians live with it. Four per cent of the N.W.T.’s population adds up to approximately 1,760 people.

At Stanton Territorial Hospital, an FASD Community and Family Support Program completes 10 FASD assessments per year. Those 10 patients get support through the program until they are 18 years old. After that, the government refers them to the same support services offered to all residents with disabilities.

N.W.T. residents over the age of 19 can’t get a diagnosis in the territory, and the Department of Health does not offer a way for people in this age group to get a diagnosis in the South.

Elkin said she isn’t sure a multi-million dollar, 10-year strategy would make much of a difference in the territory.

“I think it’s just a matter of supporting people,” she said.

Retrieved from: http://www.cbc.ca/news/canada/north/nwt-fasd-strategy-1.4406531

Posted by 

CMHA, NATIONAL ADDICTIONS AWARENESS WEEK: WORDS MATTER

graphic-for-blog-post-on-language-640x315

Recovery Language: A Guide

Here are some ways to avoid using language that stigmatizes substance use and addiction:

  1. Use “people-first language.” For instance, refer to “person who uses substances”, or “person who has a substance use disorder”; and not a “drug user”, “addict” or “alcoholic”. This is more neutral language that helps to maintain the individuality of the person.
  2. Refer to “substance use” rather than “substance abuse”. “Abuse” or “abuse” has been shown to contribute to negative outcomes, and may be more likely to occur.
  3. Choose to recognize that substance use disorders are health disorders. They are not the result of any kind of character flaw or lack of personal willpower. In fact, substance use disorders are the most common mental health disorder.
  4. Choose to refer to “drug poisoning” rather than to “drug overdose” as the latter perpetuates the myth that a person has “brought this on themselves”.
  5. Referring to a “drug suit,” or “drug of choice” implies that the person can simply choose to stop. Refer to “the substance a person is using”.
  6. Choose language that promotes the recovery process. This means not describing a person being “clean” or “dirty” but rather “not currently using substances”. Also, refer to a person who is not using substances, or is reducing use, as being “in recovery”.
  7. Avoid perpetuating negative stereotypes and biases through the use of slang and pejorative names.
  8. The use of non-stigmatizing language also applies when describing a person with other mental health problems and illnesses.

References:

Michael P. Botticelli. Memo: Changing the Language of Addiction, Office of the National Drug Control Policy. 2017.

Lauren M. Broyles, Ingrid A. Binswanger, Jennifer A. Jenkins, Deborah S. Finnell, Babalola Faseru, Alan Cavaiola, Marianne Pugatch & Adam J. Gordon. Confronting Inadvertent Stigma and Pejorative Language in Addiction Scholarship: A Recognition and Response . Abuse Substance  Vol. 35, Iss.3.2014

John F. Kelly, Richard Saitz & Sarah Wakeman. Language, Substance Use Disorders, and Policy: The Need to Reach Consensus on an Addiction-Ary Alcoholism Treatment Quarterly  Vol 34, Iss 1.2016

MG Weiss, J Ramakrishna, & D. Somma. Health-related stigma: Rethinking Concepts and Interventions. Psychol Health Med . 2006; 11: 277-87.

Michael P. Botticelli, & Howard K.Koh. Changing the Language of Addiction. JAMA October 4, 2016 Volume 316, Number 13

www.facesandvoicesofrecovery.org .

canadian-mental-health-association-logo

Retrieved from: https://cmha.ca/news/cmha-recognizes-national-addictions-awareness-week/ 

Posted by